A statement to GMs about gamer consent

We want to thank all the game masters for all their support this year and/or in the past.  We appreciate all you have done and how well the games have been received.   A recent topic has hit the internet since the release of Consent in Gaming book, by Monte Cook Games.  While we do not plan to have “trigger warning” checklist at the table or online, we do want to address this topic.

Going into this,  we do feel this should go without saying but we are going to say it anyway, just in case.  We need the game masters/hosts at MACE to be mindful of their table and who is playing. Remember that we have a variety of gamer personality types and ages. Please gauge the table before you start running. Some material may not be suitable for those playing. The game is for the players and not just you as the game master or host.

In this vein, we recommend, especially games that have story elements to it (RPGs in particular) to address any controversial topics up front and give the players a chance to opt-out if they so choose.  Please be communicative to the players at your table and be sure all are enjoying themselves.  We are all here to have fun!

Thanks again for all your hard work in making MACE the best tabletop convention in the Carolinas and I look forward to seeing you at MACE.

OGRe 104: Schedule Posters, Updated (MACE 2019)

I have once again made some changes to the schedule posters that I want people to be aware of.  Here are instructions on how to read our schedule posters.  We understand it is a lot of information.  We are simply trying to convey this information the best way we know how for everyone interested. We are trying to reduce the amount of questions you need to ask me or my staff and provide you with an easy way to determine the three basics of convention gaming – what, when and where!

For those familiar with the schedule Posters, here are the changes I have made since last year:

  • No more checkboxes – In the past, in those games that needed it, I used checkboxes to indicate how full a game is.  For a long time, I recognized that the posers were entirely too busy, making it difficult to read.   It was also very difficult to keep accurate on-site.  I dropped them for those reasons.  In the end, we just got too big for that method to be practical.  What does remain is the color dot icon which will give you an idea of the game’s status.  In the end, it’s best to look at OGRe online to find out the current status of the game.
  • Open Demos displayed first – All games are divided out by start time.  I have separated out the open demos in each start time, displaying them first, color coded in green.  From that start time onward, the host is running open demos of the particular games and all you need to do is walk up to play.
  • Panels are color coded in blue.

What are the posters?

Onsite, at the convention, we like to provide with easy means to see what is going on.  That includes printed schedules, online resources and schedule posters.  The schedule posters are located at gaming registration where you can use the tickets to sign up if you don’t have online access to OGRe at the con.  Please note that Internet access at MACE in Charlotte will not be commonly available to attendees unless they have a hotel room.

 

The schedule posters the simplest means for people to see what is going on at the con.  We at the registration desk attempt to keep things updated on the posters as best as possible but it is not always 100% accurate.  it is a manual system and in some cases we do not have enough volunteers to always keep it up to date.

 

The above sampling shows Organized Play (Pathfinder Society, in this case).  The Dot indicates that you need to go to the Organized Play room (University E in this case).  Organized Play are organized and coordinated on site by their own coordinators and players will need to find that coordinator ti find out what games are available.

This above sampling shows the first row of open demos for the Friday 3:00 PM.  From this point on, there will be open demos of H.E.R.O card game in the Gallery.  Feel free to go to the game location and try it out.
The above poster sample shows the bottom row of scheduled tabletop board games, panels and first few rows of role playing games.  The Panels are color coded in blue.  The dots indicate all the games are open and have seats open.

Above you will see the special scheduled open demos of the No Ordinary Gamers.  They are open demos but they are scheduled.  In these cases, go to the game location and find the coordinator.

Find your game

The first thing you do is find the game you are looking for the Game Name/Game Title (Large letters next to the game logo).  Each day is listed under a different colored header (Friday is light blue, Saturday is sort of a Pink/Light Purple, and Sunday is  Red.  Start Times are listed on the left side.  Games are listed by Start Time and ordered alphabetically by game name, but grouped by Game Type (Board/Card Games, RPGs, Miniature Games, etc).  You can see how long a game is (duration) by the Time Slot on the right of each row, listed with “When:”.  Other details are listed on the right as well including Host, room and table.

For regular non-Organized Play one-shot RPGs, and other tabletop board/card/mini games, you can find the game name listed. However, for Organized Play, we list the scenario name since the game itself is a given.

  • DDAL = D&D Adventure League, the organized play associated to Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edition RPG.
  • PFS = Pathfinder Society, the organized play associated with the Pathfinder RPG
  • SFS = Starfinder Society, the organized play associated with the sci-fi spin off of Pathfinder, called Starfinder.
  • SRM = Shadowrun Missions, the organized play associated with the Shadowrun RPG

Organized Play games traditionally requires the players to have their own characters although there are pre-gens available online.  On the posters, Organized Play is listed under the RPGs segregated out by a yellow band denoting the specific organized play game (see above).

For regular/one-shot/general play (non-Organized Play) RPGs, the game is listed and the title is listed in blue on the line below it.

For a variety of board games, sometimes the title is blank but sometimes it lists the type of demo, scenario or tournament is being run.

Check the Dot

Once you find the game you are looking for, CHECK THE DOT!  That contains A LOT of information for the player.  Here is the basic meaning of each dot.

If it is full (red dot), we are only taking alternates for that game (and not all games do).  However, Alternates must be managed by you and the GM.  We don’t do anything special for alternates.  The GM is required to give every opportunity to those that signed up first.  We instruct them to wait at least 10 to 15 minutes after the session has started before accepting alternates.

The most important icon in that bunch however is the one we call the “target.”

For games with the “target,” players do not need to do anything other than go to the location of the game.  Many of these games are separated out by types of demos.  You will see the following as further delineations for some games, particularly tabletop board and card games.

  • Open Demos/Open Seating
  • Tournaments
  • Scheduled

As stated above, most Organized Play games are coordinated by a single coordinator or group of coordinators.  The coordinate the seating of their games based on Game Master or Judge availability.  You will need to find that coordinator to find a table to play at.  Most of the time, the coordinator will be indistinguishable from other GMs in OP because they are running games themselves.  You will have to simply ask us the name of the coordinator and ask around.

Other games with a “target” can be demos, or tournaments coordinated by other people as well.  Or the slot may be long enough for more than one game.  Or the coordinator of the game may have multiple copies.  Instead of trying to micro-manage all of that, we simply encourage the player to go to the location and work it out with the GM or event coordinator.

Filling out the ticket

Most people pre-register online before the convention, which is why many of the games are full when you arrive.  We highly recommend that you do this.  If you are not fortunate enough to have preregistered, you can sign up for whatever is left onsite, using the ticket system.

The only games you need to fill a ticket out for are those with limited seating (solid color dot).

  • No ticket is needed for open demos and open seating games (target dot).
  • No ticket is needed for organized play as they are coordinated by individual coordinators and they muster their tables onsite.
  • No ticket is needed for tournaments because they too are coordinated by a tournament director who musters the matches onsite.

For all other games, do the following

  • Fill out this form with information for all the games you want to sign up for.
  • Quick Register: We need both OGRE ID Number and Event Number.  If you don’t have both, fill out the other information and you will get an OGRe Number.
  • OGRe Number is your OGRe ID Number (if you have one).  One will be made for you if you do not have one.
  • Quick Register is the one listed on the schedule, highlighted in Yellow on the posters.
  • Take the forms to the coordinator.
  • The Coordinator will confirm each game and sign you up. If a game is full, he or she will tell you.

Once confirmed, the forms can act as tickets for your games. GMs have been instructed to give priority to ticket holders. Hand the Ticket to the GM to show you pre-register.  Once that is confirmed, the GM or you can do what you want with the ticket. Please show up on time.  These tickets are only good until about 5 to 10 minutes after the start time (GM’s discretion)

OGRe 7.5 update – Personal Game Libraries for Open Gaming

Version 7.5 Release Notes

  • A number of bug fixes and clean up behind the scenes.
  • Game Proposal system is a little more mobile friendly with more integration of Bootstrap 4
  • Significant updates to Admin functions.
  • My Profile is changed to My Dashboard
  • The Additional the Game Libraries to the Dashboard

Version 7.5 of OGRe has a significant update to it.  It is something I called the Personal Game Library.

A user can use the Game Library functions when you simply want to bring games to the convention and not really commit to a specific slot or schedule. With this function, you can make a list of games that you plan to bring to the convention or gaming event and set when you are available to run them. Once approved, these will be listed as Personal Game Library events for the Open Gaming Area (table unassigned). This is simply letting people know your plans. This is only commitment to those that are interested in playing your games. We all understand plans change. Once approved, these events will allow people to sign up to simple show interest. By establishing a game library at our event, you are granting the people signing up permission to contact you to show their interest and their availability. Simple steps to get your game library listed faster:

  1. Establish the Personal Game Library event by naming it. For example, Jon’s Awesome Game Library.
  2. Then add games to your library. You use the Board Game Geek search utility to add the games.  For now, Manual Entry is disabled.
  3. Schedule your availability. This is the window of time you plan to play games, allowing for meals and sleep, etc.

Use the full name of the game. Board Game Geek/RPG Geek are the best resources to get game names. If you plan to bring a lot of games, just list the top 5 to 10 that you think will interest people.

Rest In Peace: Richard “Warbunny” Desautels

A good friend to JustUs Productions and MACE – Richard “Warbunny” Desautels – passed away last night (April 7, 2019) from issues with his lung. Hhe would be greatly miss.  He was always ready to run games for MACE and it was always Harnmaster.  We all need to raise a glass, say a prayer and celebrate another life of a good gamer and friend.

What I remember about him is his relentless passion for Harnmaster and how he would run it all weekend at early MACE events.  Of course, as time went on, he ran less and less.  I was always entertaining and a joy to talk to.  I will sorely miss him.

OGRE 101: Open Demos & Signing up for them

Key Definitions

Open Demos – Open demos are game events set up usually by publishers or game designers over a long span of time, with the intent of running as many instances of their game during that span as they can, with the constraints of space and time.  They are usually listed by publisher or game name.  They have a fixed location but not a fixed slot.  The schedule shown is the time span the host plans to be at the convention to demo the game.


Open Demos games are listed in OGRe like this – by Publisher:

or this – by Game name

If listed by Publisher, they usually have multiple games they want to demo on demand.  If listed by game, the host has one game to demo as often as he can.  In either case, the host may have multiple copies of the game that he or she can demo.

They are usually listed with a long time span because this is the schedule the host has chosen to demo his game.  The time a single demo takes will be listed in the title.  The exact time of the demo is up to the player and the host.  Signing up simply indicates the player’s interest in at least one demo of this game. We encourage you to contact the host to arrange a time for that demo.

You do not have to sign up to play these games however.  Walk-up players are welcome at all open demos games.  If they can fit you in a game, they will.  If they can’t fir you in at that moment, they will give you a time when they can.  These games are designated with the Target icon on the posters so anyone can walk up without signing up.

Scheduled Demos

Some games are denoted as scheduled demos. These are limited open demos, limited by the time slot and the number of copies the team has. However, these games can be demo’ed at anytime during the weekend. The given entry is simply a scheduled event for that particular game.  Pick up sessions of that game are possible any time, just ask the host in charge.

Emberbright Character Generation Guide

Here are are guidelines for creating your own characters for the Emberbright Living Campaign D&D 5e adventures. First, a reminder that this is a trial of home-brew characters so the rules may change between conventions and characters made during these beta phases may not be cannon after we finalize the rules. So please do not get too attached to these first characters. On to the nitty gritty.

1. Characters will be made using the 27 point buy method. Normal restrictions in the Players Handbook apply.

2. You must take the Class/Background packages for starting equipment. No Substitutions at this time.

3. The races currently allowed are Human (and the variant Human), Elf (High and Wood elves only), Igni (Rules here), Forged (Rules here) and Dwarves.

4. All classes in the Players Handbook are allowed at this time.

5. All characters will need to be emailed to me by Nov. 1st. Once submitted and approved no changes will be allowed. Email them to me at You have not entered an email address for this shortcode.  with the subject ‘Emberbright Character Submission’ and once I look it over I will reply with approved or any corrections needed questions/clarifications.

That should cover it for now. If you have any questions please feel free to email me with Emberbright in the subject and I will reply as quickly as I can and if needed I will update this with corrections and adjustments.

I look forward to you testing my module designs with your creations.

How to find an open game table?

Do you want to run a pick-up game but can’t find an open table?  We have noticed that this is a common problem, especially at those events with limited or no open gaming space.  We realize that with all our scheduled games as well as all the demos we have that table space is hard to find. Here are a few rules and suggestions to follow to find an open table.

Definitions

General/Open Play Event – These are primarily scheduled games – RPGs or other tabletop games (board, minis or card).  These are scheduled games that any paid attendee can sign up to play – online or onsite.  In most cases, these have limited seating and once they are full, they are closed.  As a policy, we do not allow for Alternate Players or Overflow Players to sign up online prior to the con for these games.  However, we do allow for them onsite.

Organized Play Event – These are scheduled events, mostly RPGs, that are organized by a specific group, like Pathfinder Society, D&D Adventurers League, and others.  These are limited seating but allow for Alternate Players in case the coordinator finds a new Game Master.  Each organized play area is managed by a specific coordinator and they usually handle mustering and table allocation on-site.   Open tables in this room are NOT open to use by anyone else unless the coordinator approves.   Traditionally, Organized Play is divided out on the printed schedules and posters as it has special requirements for the players (like existing characters, specific character levels, etc).

Player’s Choice/Personal Game Library (formerly Player’s Choice/Open Demos) – If this appears on the schedule, this is a scheduled event of a small selection of games that the host has chosen to bring. It is a limited pick-up game event that is hosted by a specific GM.  The table is not open to any games and the table is reserved for that particular Host during the defined time slot.

Open, Official, or Unofficial Demos – Many small companies, publishers, and kickstarting companies come to our events to run demos of their games but they don’t want to stick to a specific session schedule.  We accommodate that by blocking off time for when they are going to be there and denote in the entry somewhere just how long a traditional demo of their game takes.  Again, these are not open gaming tables, they are open demos of a specific game.

Open Gaming – These are tables allocated specifically for pick up games of whatever kinds that can fit on that table.  If you need to bring tables together to create a larger space, please ask for approval before doing so.  These tables DO NOT appear on the schedule (online, posters, PDF or printed) and usually have a colored tablecloth of some kind.

Want an open table to play a game?

Open gaming tables are intended for games to be played on, not open demo tables for last minute publishers or pre-kickstarter promotions.  If you want a table for the latter, then you need to talk to the gaming coordinator to see if there is any appropriate tables available for those purposes.

If you have a game, have found some interested players, and want to find an open table to play said game, the best way to find a table is as follows:

  1. Find any tables marked with a colored tablecloth open.  These are tables in a designated area, usually, and marked on event maps. Availability may vary throughout the weekend, however.
  2. If no open gaming tables are available, you can check the table tents on each of the tables allocated to scheduled games.  Each table tent has a schedule on it for what is supposed to be there and when.  If your pick-up game can be played and finished before the next scheduled event on that table, you are welcome to that table. But you must be finished and off the table before the next scheduled game arrives.
  3. If none of the above are available, check tables where games did not make.  Some games just don’t get any players and those tables can become free until the next game is scheduled. I ask all GMs to wait to up to 15 minutes before freeing up the table, however.   Once that table is freed up, step #2 still applies.
  4. If none of the above work, check the hotel lobby (if applicable) or other locations where there might be free tables available.

If you still can not find a table, unfortunately that means all our tables are full.  We do apologize and work very hard to provide as much opportunity to game at our events as the space allows, but we only have so much space.  Typically,  we have dozens of small publishers and kickstarters, hundreds of GMs and usually a couple of large events to schedule.  Open gaming is difficult to allocate when we have so much to schedule and give space to.  When we can, we do.  In most of our events, Saturday afternoon is the worst time to seek out an open table.  That’s what we call our peak time and all tables are more than likely either allocated or taken.  Plan ahead, if you can.  Muster your players ahead of time. Work with the coordinators and we will work with you.

OGRe 103: Updated Schedule Posters (MACE West 2018)

I have once again made some slight changes to the schedule posters that I want people to be aware of.  Here are instructions on how to read our schedule posters.  We understand it is a lot of information.  We are simply trying to convey this information the best way we know how for everyone interested. We are trying to reduce the amount of questions you need to ask me or my staff and provide you with an easy way to determine the three basics of convention gaming – what, when and where!

What are the posters?

Onsite, at the convention, we like to provide with easy means to see what is going on.  That includes printed schedules, online resources and schedule posters.  The posters are located at gaming registration and you can use the tickets to sign up if you don’t have online access at the con.  Please note that Internet access at MACE in Charlotte will not be commonly available to attendees unless they have a hotel room.

 

It’s the simplest means for people to see what is going on at the con.  We at the registration desk attempt to keep things updated on the posters as best as possible but it is not always 100% accurate.  it is a manual system and in some cases we do not have enough volunteers to always keep it up to date.

Find your game

The first thing you do is find the game you are looking for the Game Name/Game Title(Largest letters next to the game logo).  Each day is listed under a different colored header (Friday is light blue, Saturday is sort of a Pink/Light Purple, and Sunday is  Red.  Then each Start Time is listed on the left side, as you can see above (Friday 4:00 PM).  Games are listed by Start Time and ordered alphabetically by game name, but grouped by Game Type (Board/Card Games, RPGs, Miniature Games, etc).  You can see how long a game is (duration) by the Time Slot on the right of each row, listed with “When:”.

For regular one-shot RPGs (non-Organized Play), and other tabletop board/card/mini games, you can find the game name listed. However, for Organized Play, we list the scenario name since the game itself is a given .

  • DDEX & DDAL = D&D Adventure League, the organized play associated to Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edition RPG.
  • PFS = Pathfinder Society, the organized play associated with the Pathfinder RPG
  • SRM = Shadowrun Missions, the organized play associated with the Shadowrun RPG
  • CoC = Recently, the new Call of Cthulhu 7th edition has started an organized play campaign called Cults of Chaos.

Organized Play games traditionally require the player to provide the character although  there are pre-gens available online.  On the posters, Organized Play is listed under the RPGs segregated out by a yellow band denoting the specific organized play game (see above).

For regular or general play one-shot RPGs, the game is listed and the title is listed in blue on the line below it, right justified.  They also include seating boxes showing available seats for that game.

Above is an example of a variety of board games.  The title (in blue) is sometimes blank but sometimes list the type of demo, scenario or tournament that is being run.

Everything you need to know about the game is listed along the same top line from the Game Name.  Game Name (what), Location (Where in Green Text), and Time slot (When).  A note on slot length, we traditionally use Board

Check the Status Dots

Once you find the game you are looking for, check the dot icon.  That contains A LOT of information for the player.  Here is the basic meaning of each dot.

Before you attempt to sign up for a game onsite, take a look at this icon.  If it is full (red dot), we are only taking alternates for that game (and not all games do).  However, Alternates must be managed by you and the GM.  We don’t do anything special for alternates.  The GM is required to give every opportunity to those that signed up first.  We instruct them to wait at least 10 to 15 minutes after the session has started before accepting alternates.

The most important icon in that bunch however is the one we call the “target.”

For those games, you do not need to do anything other than go to the location of the game for whatever reason is listed in the message box.  Once change I have recently made is separate out many of these types of games from the others.  You will now see the following as further delineations for some games, particularly tabletop board and card games.

  • Open Demos/Open Seating
  • Touranments
  • Scheduled

Most Organized Play games are coordinated by a single person and you will need to find that person to find a table.  Most of the time, the coordinator will not be distinguishable from other GMs in OP because they are running games themselves.  You will have to simply ask us the name of the coordinator and ask around.

Other games with a “target” can be demos, or tournaments coordinated by other people as well.  Or the slot may be long enough for more than one game.  Or the coordinator of the game may have multiple copies.  Instead of trying to micro-manage all of that, we encourage the player to simply go to the location and work it out with the GM ro event coordinator.  An example above shows the Warmachine events.  They are targets because they are coordinated by a single person (list as the Host).

Important

We show the state of the Organized play tables as of preregistration, however, unlike regular games, we do not keep up with the current state of organized play, as they are handled by the coordinator and can be more fluid other games.

2016-poster3a

Above is an example of organized play.  Notice that the full games and the open games have a “target” and the open seats of a question mark.   Do not expect to sign up at gaming registration for these games.  They are handled by the coordinator.  But this at least gives those interested in playing these an idea of what might be full and might have open seats still.  The later in the weekend we get, however, the less likely those seats will be open.

For other games with open seats (blank boxes), we ask you fill in the box with an “X” once your we sign you onsite.  We prefer you wait until after we verify that the poster is accurate (as we may not have had time to verify and update them, it is a manual process.)   Obviously, OGRe is the most accurate way to determine if the games are full or not but we supply the poster system so you don’t have to always rely on that.

2016-poster1a

Additionally, there is a notation that indicates preregistration overflow.  Above you can see an example of a game with a few overflow pre-registrations.  We won’t be  keeping up with this throughout the weekend but this at least gives you an idea of the state of the game at pre-registration and the likelihood you will get a seat at that particular game.

Filling out the ticket

Most people preregister online before the convention, which is why many of the games are full when you arrive.  If you are not fortunate enough to have that priviledge, you can sing up for whatever is left onsite, using the ticket system.

The only games you need to fill a ticket out for are those with limited seating.  No ticket is needed for open demos and open seating games.  No ticket is needed for organized play as they are coordinated by individual coordinators and they muster their tables onsite.  No ticket is needed for tournaments because they too are coordinated by a tournament director who musters the matches onsite.

For all others, do the following

  • Fill out this form with information for all the games you want to sign up for.
  • Quick Register: We need both OGRE ID Number and Event Number.  If you don’t have both, fill out the other information and you will get an OGRe Number.
  • OGRe Number is your OGRe ID Number (if you have one).  One will be made for you if you do not have one.
  • Quick Register is the one listed on the schedule, highlighted in Yellow on the posters.
  • Take the forms to the coordinator.
  • The Coordinator will confirm each game and sign you up. If a game is full, he or she will tell you.

Once confirmed, the forms can act as tickets for your games. GMs have been instructed to give priority to ticket holders. Hand the Ticket to the GM to show you preregister.  Once that is confirmed, the GM or you can do what you want with the ticket. Please show up on time.  These tickets are only good until about 5 to 10 minutes after the start time (GM’s discretion)

5 Simple tips to make your MACE experience easier

(1) Print your own schedule and/or tickets. See the this link

(2) Check your email before you leave for the con for any cancellation notifications.

(3) Realize that the schedule posters, the table signs and the room signs are all a physical system and can’t change dynamically. We try to update the posters as often as possible. However, for example, if OGRe is showing a game full and we have not updated the posters, then that just means we have not had a chance to update the posters.

(4) If in doubt, check OGRe. It’s remains live all weekend, so people could be signing up anytime. If you have a means to check it – Tablet or Laptop work best- use it first before you use the physical system of writing stuff down on tickets and handing them to us. It just makes things easier for everyone. Caveat: Phone was left out of the above list because we do realize that OGRe is not 100% mobile friendly and totally own that. If all you have is a phone, it’s fine to come to gaming registration first.

(5) Understand that Data Entry Errors happen. We have to keep up with over 400 games, 150+ GMs and their preferences, needs and schedules, and present them as simple and fast as we can. There is just one person entering this data in and that person also has a real job, three kids, a very tolerant and patient wife and other things to deal with in life. So don’t be surprised, exasperated, or frustrated if an poster entry, table sign entry or room sign entry might seem wrong.

OGRe 102: Updated Schedule Posters (MACE 2017)

I have made some slight changes to the schedule posters that I want people to be aware of.  Here are instructions on how to read our schedule posters.  We understand it is a lot of information.  We are simply trying to convey this information the best way we know how for everyone interested. We are trying to reduce the amount of questions you need to ask me or my staff and provide you with an easy way to determine the three basics of convention gaming – what, when and where!

What are the posters?

Onsite, at the convention, we like to provide with easy means to see what is going on.  That includes printed schedules, online resources and schedule posters.  The posters are located at gaming registration and you can use the tickets to sign up if you don’t have online access at the con.  Please note that Internet access at MACE in Charlotte will not be commonly available to attendees unless they have a hotel room.

mace.2013.web.125

It’s the simplest means for people to see what is going on at the con.  We at the registration desk attempt to keep things updated on the posters as best as possible but it is not always 100% accurate.

Find your game

The first thing you do is find the game you are looking for the Game Name/Game Title(Largest letters next to the game logo).  Each day is listed under a different colored header (Friday is light blue, Saturday is sort of a Pink/Light Purple, and Sunday is  Red.  Then each Start Time is listed on the left side, as you can see above (Friday 4:00 PM).  Games are listed by Start Time and ordered alphabetically by game name, but grouped by Game Type (Board/Card Games, RPGs, Miniature Games, etc).  You can see how long a game is (duration) by the Time Slot on the right of each row, listed with “When:”.

For regular one-shot RPGs (non-Organized Play), and other tabletop board/card/mini games, you can find the game name listed. However, for Organized Play, we list the scenario name since the game itself is a given .

  • DDEX & DDAL = D&D Adventure League, the organized play associated to Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edition RPG.
  • PFS = Pathfinder Society, the organized play associated with the Pathfinder RPG
  • SRM = Shadowrun Missions, the organized play associated with the Shadowrun RPG
  • CoC = Recently, the new Call of Cthulhu 7th edition has started an organized play campaign called Cults of Chaos.

Organized Play games traditionally require the player to provide the character although  there are pre-gens available online.  On the posters, Organized Play is listed under the RPGs segregated out by a yellow band denoting the specific organized play game (see above).

For regular or general play one-shot RPGs, the game is listed and the title is listed in blue on the line below it, right justified.  They also include seating boxes showing available seats for that game.

Above is an example of a variety of board games.  The title (in blue) is sometimes blank but sometimes list the type of demo, scenario or tournament that is being run.

Everything you need to know about the game is listed along the same top line from the Game Name.  Game Name (what), Location (Where in Green Text), and Time slot (When).  A note on slot length, we traditionally use Board

Check the Status Dots

Once you find the game you are looking for, check the dot icon.  That contains A LOT of information for the player.  Here is the basic meaning of each dot.

Before you attempt to sign up for a game onsite, take a look at this icon.  If it is full (red dot), we are only taking alternates for that game (and not all games do).  However, Alternates must be managed by you and the GM.  We don’t do anything special for alternates.  The GM is required to give every opportunity to those that signed up first.  We instruct them to wait at least 10 to 15 minutes after the session has started before accepting alternates.

The most important icon in that bunch however is the one we call the “target.”

For those games, you do not need to do anything other than go to the location of the game for whatever reason is listed in the message box.

Most Organized Play games are coordinated by a single person and you will need to find that person to find a table.  Most of the time, the coordinator will not be distinguishable from other GMs in OP because they are running games themselves.  You will have to simply ask us the name of the coordinator and ask around.

Other games with a “target” can be demos, or tournaments coordinated by other people as well.  Or the slot may be long enough for more than one game.  Or the coordinator of the game may have multiple copies.  Instead of trying to micro-manage all of that, we encourage the player to simply go to the location and work it out with the GM ro event coordinator.  An example above shows the Warmachine events.  They are targets because they are coordinated by a single person (list as the Host).

Important

We Show the state of the Organized play tables as of preregistration, however, unlike regular games, we do not keep up with the current state of organized play, as they are handled by the coordinator and can be more fluid other games.

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Above is an example of organized play.  Notice that the full games and the open games have a “target” and the open seats of a question mark.   Do not expect to sign up at gaming registration for these games.  They are handled by the coordinator.  But this at least gives those interested in playing these an idea of what might be full and might have open seats still.  The later in the weekend we get, however, the less likely those seats will be open.

For other games with open seats (blank boxes), we ask you fill in the box with an “X” once your we sign you onsite.  We prefer you wait until after we verify that the poster is accurate (as we may not have had time to verify and update them, it is a manual process.)   Obviously, OGRe is the most accurate way to determine if the games are full or not but we supply the poster system so you don’t have to always rely on that.

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Additionally, there is a notation that indicates preregistration overflow.  Above you can see an example of a game with a few overflow pre-registrations.  We won’t be  keeping up with this throughout the weekend but this at least gives you an idea of the state of the game at pre-registration and the likelihood you will get a seat at that particular game.